Saturday, 14 March 2015

Lent and Easter Schedule - 2015




I would like to thank everyone who came to the meeting in February. It was pleasing and very encouraging to see such enthusiasm and commitment to maintaining a regular Mass in the traditional rite.

The numbers at the February and March Masses have been encouraging and the collection for March was £195.44; thank you to everyone who contributed so generously.

Listed below are the Lenten, Holy Week and Easter schedules:

Friday 27th March 2015 - Oliver to Calvary: A Lenten Meditation with the Eckington Singers
St Theresa's Church,
Prince of Wales Road,
Sheffield,
S2 1EY
Time: 7.30 p.m.
The Eckington Singers will be performing J. H Maunder's sacred cantata 'Olivet to Calvary'.

Friday 3rd April 2015 - Good Friday - Tenebrae
St Joseph's Church,
St Joseph's Road,
Sheffield
S13 9AT
Time: 9.30 a.m.

Saturday 4th April 2015 - Holy Saturday - Tenebrae
St Theresa's Church,
Prince of Wales Road,
Sheffield,
S2 1EY
Time: 9.30 a.m.

Sunday 5th April 2015 - Easter Sunday - Solemn Mass of the Resurrection
St Theresa's Church,
Prince of Wales Road,
Sheffield,
S2 1EY
Time: 12.15 p.m.


Friday, 13 March 2015

Silence in the Liturgy

Silence is one of the most characteristic aspects of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite that marks it apart from the Novus Ordo. Many of the prayers said by the priest are done so either silently or inaudibly. There are very good reasons for silence in the traditional liturgy; a practice that dates back centuries to the early Church. In this short video, Dr Joseph Shaw explains the reasons for what many mass-goers regard as one of the most attractive and uplifting aspects of the Traditional Latin Mass.


Sunday, 1 March 2015

Mass Facing East: Two thousand years of liturgical orientation

One of the most obvious differences between the Old Rite of Mass and the Novus Ordo is the direction in which the priest faces. 
Worship 'ad orientem', or facing East, is an ancient practice going back to the earliest centuries of the Church. Criticised by advocates of the New Mass as 'the priest turning his back to the people', it is nothing of the sort. Quite the reverse, in fact, it unites priest and people in a deep and spiritual way unheard of in most Novus Ordo celebrations. 
Here Dr Joseph Shaw explains the ancient roots of Mass facing East, its theological and spiritual symbolism, and why arguments claiming that Mass facing the people was the practice in the early Church are totally spurious.

Source: Latin Mass Society of England & Wales